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3.2 Eye contact
The interpreter's job is to make it possible for people who speak different languages to communicate and connect with each other as though they spoke the same language. A good interpreter is a conduit relaying a message, not a participant in the interaction. To reinforce this, it is your job to ask everyone to speak directly to each other and not to you.

It is, of course, natural for participants to want to look at you because you understand and speak their language. Try to discourage this by minimizing eye contact.

Since turning toward people while speaking invites eye contact, the interpreter always speaks in a more neutral direction. When you focus on a notepad, gaze at the floor, or look out above an audience, the participants are more likely to look at those with whom they are interacting because they are not getting eye contact from you.

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